Monday, 3 October 2016

I Met My Wife In Paris

Cool Cards Exclusive Design. Printed to same high standard as our Jesus & Mo cards, say hello to Paris. We'll soon have an 'insert name here' card which won't say Paris, but with any place name or words of your choice.

I met my wife in Paris.

I said
"What are you doing here?"

Is it sexist of us that we don't also have an "I met my husband in Paris" card? 

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Early 20th Century Postwomen

14 Rare Vintage Pictures Show Postwomen in the early 20th Century

These are what postwomen looked like from between the 1900s to 1910s.

Source, and more photos - Vintage Everyday
Also - 24 Vintage Photos Show Postmen from more than 100 Years Ago

Wednesday, 30 March 2016

Postie of the Month - ?Year

Talk about going the extra mile..!

A dedicated postmaster embarked on a 300-mile journey to hand-deliver a passport on time.
David Shepherd, 26, of Stratton, Cornwall, drove 50 miles and took four trains after realising he had forgotten to get it in the post.
The passport had to get to customer Hugh Munro in Rye, Sussex, by 09:00 BST the following day so that his planned visit to Amsterdam could go ahead.
Mr Shepherd said his instinct was to "keep the customer happy".

Mr Munro was heading to the Dutch capital for a charity board meeting after stopping off at his sister's house in Rye.
Mr Shepherd, who has been postmaster at Stratton Store for 11 months, said: "I knew it was vital he had it.

"His neighbour brought it in. But it wasn't given to the postman at collection time, so I finished work at 7pm and drove to Exeter to catch the 1am train to London."
Mr Shepherd drove 50 miles to Exeter; caught the train to London Paddington; took the Tube to St Pancras; a further train to Ashford, Kent; and a final train to Rye.
He had just 15 minutes to deliver the passport before catching the train straight back, a journey which cost him more than £150.
Source: BBC

Lost Puppy - Eric J. Decetis

Best-selling greeting card artist in the world? I don't know, but there's no doubting the popularity of Eric's work.

We're pleased to add a very funny range of Eric's cards to Cool Cards, including the iconic, all time favourite, "Lost Puppy"!

Lost Puppy - Eric Decetis

Read an interview with Eric over at the Sacramento Press.

And check out his YouTube interview with KCRW.

Then check out all of our Eric Decetis greeting cards over at Cool Cards!

Thursday, 15 October 2015

Design: Nikolai Tolstyh

Artist Nikolai Tolstyh creates beautiful photographic images from cutouts which remind us of our watercolour cards by Daniel Mackie

Compare: Nikolai


With: Daniel Mackie

Instagram: Nikolai Tolstyh
Cool Cards: Daniel Mackie

Via: My Modern Met


Monday, 12 October 2015

More Spoof Ladybird Books

Hot on the heels of our Miriam Ella Ladybird Book spoof book come official Ladybird spoof books.

"A series of adult tongue-in-cheek Ladybird books by the co-writers of TV's Miranda, with titles such as The Shed and The Husband, are to be published.
The eight books have been written by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris, who have also written for comedy shows That Mitchell and Webb Look.
The titles include The Shed, The Wife, The Husband, The Hangover, Mindfulness, Dating and The Hipster.
The pair also wrote for Charlie Brooker's Screenwipe.
Brooker said: "This is such a good idea I'm currently experiencing all the physical sensations of anger because I didn't think of it, whereas Jason and Joel did."

Read more: BBC Guardian Independent 
Cool Cards: Ladybird book greeting cards

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Alan Johnson: The Post Office and Me

First shown: 6 Oct 2015
Available for 29 days
Alan Johnson MP (and former postman) tells the story of 500 years of the Royal Mail, and discovers how the humble British postal system changed the course of British history. Alan started out as a postman in London when he was 18, in 1968. He would eventually rise to become general secretary of the Communication Workers Union before being elected as an MP. So the post office changed his life, and set him on the path to parliament.
In this film, he explores the rich history of this great institution, and reveals how it has been a force for progress in British society. The British post office led the world in creating a cheap, accessible mail system. This was the first true revolution in mass-communication, and it changed society.
With the invention of the stamp - the famous Penny Black - in 1840, ordinary people could suddenly afford to write to each other. Businesses thrived thanks to mail order. And the volumes of mail skyrocketed - creating a postal system that would at its peak employ 250,000 people.
To tell this story - and to find out how the Royal Mail is adapting to the 21st century - Alan travels back in time to his old rounds, and into the future at a giant automated sorting office. He is given an exclusive tour of the Queen's private stamp collection to see the most precious Penny Blacks in the world. He takes a ride on a Travelling Post Office - one of the mail-sorting trains that used to criss-cross the nation through the night and that were immortalised in the film Night Mail.
He ventures beneath the streets of London to see the remains of the Royal Mail's secret underground railway, and he meets some 21st-century postmen and women to find out how the job has changed since he was doing it back in the 1960s.
Alan loved being a postman. But in the age of email, is there a future for the post?

BBC iPlayer

Saturday, 26 September 2015

Peter & Jane & Miriam - Ladybird Spoof and the Wrath of Penguin

"I wanted an iPhone" 
"I could paint that"

iPhone ladybird card

You know our spoofy Ladybird cards? Artist Miriam Elia only went and did some variations on a theme of her own and Ladybird books were not happy... As in Artist's spoof Ladybird book provokes wrath of Penguin not happy.

"An artist and comedian has been told by the publisher Penguin that her new satirical art book breaches its copyright, and if she continues to sell copies it could use the courts to seize the books and have them pulped.
Elia's version sees them visiting an exhibition at a modern art gallery and grappling with existential questions about the nature of Tracey Emin-style conceptualist work, much of it peppered with distinctly adult imagery.

Elia, an accomplished artist who trained at the Royal College of Art and has shown in a number of prestigious galleries, produced all the pictures in the book, We Go to the Gallery, herself. Some she painted, while some were collages made from scenes cut from old Ladybird books.





See also:
Ladybird Book Cards @ Cool Cards
Learning with Miriam 

Radio 4 - Womans Hour - Miriam Elia - satirical parody of the classic children’s picture book 
Artist Miriam Elia discusses her book We Go To The Gallery, a strictly for adults satirical parody of the classic children’s picture books. Miriam talks about making art funny, creating the book with her brother and the impact of her own childhood trips to galleries.

The commercial edition of We Go To The Gallery by M and E Elia is available from 21st September (2015). An artists edition of the book is out now.